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Archive for the ‘Difficult conversations’ Category

5:  Learn to negotiate – Most women need serious practise at asking for more money.  Remember, as long as you ask reasonably, your boss can only say no.  Don’t moan – argue for a rise on the basis of your performance.  Don’t threaten to resign if you don’t mean it.

6:  Be one step ahead – What objections will your boss have if you ask for more money?  Anticipate what will be said so that you have a good answer.

7:  Have a face-to-face – Ask to speak to your boss in person so you can both understand the situation and agree what can be done to change it.

8: Get some support – If a chat with your boss doesn’t work, talk to your female colleagues and gather support.  If you feel underpaid or undervalued, chances are others do too.  Lodge a complaint together.

9: Use the law – A trade union can help you fight for equal pay.  They’ll negotiate on your behalf and take legal action if necessary.

10: Be positive – Never apologise for asking for more money, believe in yourself. If you believe in yourself others will to.

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According to the Media Queen at Marie Claire there are 10 points that we should get straight before we ask for a pay rise here are the first 5 to get you started…..

1: Find out how much you are worth – Get an indea of the market rate for your role by looking at job vacancies for similar positions online or in the papers.

2: Discover what your company pays – Approach your HR department for a breakdown of wage categories.  If you’re concerned, download a form that entitles you to request key information from your employers. Visit www.equalities.gov.uk

3: Make a stand – Have you done enough for a pay rise or highlighted what you have done well.  Your arguement will have more weight if you can be specific.

4: Believe in yourself – Act as if you deserve more money – firm belief in your own worth makes others believe to.

5: Learn to negotiate – Most women need serious practise at asking for more money.  Remember, as long as you ask reasonably, your boss can only say no. Don’t moan – argue for a rise on the basis of your performance.  Don’t threaten to resign if you don’t mean it.

Look out for the next 5 ….

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Tuesday 10 November 2009
Essential for every manager!

This special workshop is for anyone who will one day need to carry out a

  • Disciplinary
  • Grievance
  • Redundancy
  • Poor performance discussion
  • Or even deliver tragic news

It may be one of the most difficult conversations in your working life.  Even the most confident and self assured person can be filled with dread, suffer stress and sleepless nights.

Learn how to:

  • Be respected for “handling the discussion in a sensitive and understanding way” without being misunderstood or viewed as harsh in your approach.
  • Have peace of mind, without the experience haunting you in the future!
  • Prepare your actual words for the discussion using a successful format which has been tried and tested over many years
  • Be confident in delivering clear messages in a dignified, sensitive and professional way
  • Control your own anxieties
  • Connect and motivate other team members to be committed to key priorities
  • Remove stress and negative energy that can permeate through an organisation
  • Handle unexpected emotional reactions
  • Be prepared for challenging questions
  • Understand the legal process

“They may forget what you said, but they will never forget how you made them feel.” Carl W. Buechner

For further information and to book please visit my website – http://www.leadatwork.com/leadership-workshops.html

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